Obviously, you've noticed the new reaction emojis on Facebook. Obviously.

We thought it was worth mentioning, because it basically changes everything. We mean, everything. When we go home tonight, everything will be different.

Instead of just "liking" our apartments, bedrooms, roommates, jobs, and friends, we'll have the chance to "love" them.

Now, when we see a photo of our arch nemesis from college on Facebook, or a particularly rousing, racist, classless speech by Donald Trump in our news feeds, we'll have a succinct way of conveying our anger.

When we see something funny, we'll now have the ability to say "Haha," and we'll also have the chance to say "Wow," to some really wow worthy stuff.

Like, for instance, how ridiculous it is that just about every Oscar nominee was white, or the fact that Sony is requiring Ke$ha to remain in her contract despite the fact that her producer allegedly raped and emotionally abused her.

[anad]

Yeah, those are some "wow" worthy current events indeed, and we definitely don't want to "like," those. Thanks, Facebook!

"For more than a year we have been conducting global research including focus groups and surveys to determine what types of reactions people would want to use most," wrote Sammi Krug, Facebook's Product Manager, in a blog post.

"We understand that this is a big change, and want to be thoughtful about rolling this out," Krug wrote.

It's a big change indeed. Facebook launched 12 years ago, and for those past 12 years, we've only been able to "like" things, including things that made us really sad.

Now, though, we can express to a user when we're sad about something. We can show empathy.

agencia_kife O Facebook começou a liberar as alternativas ao botão de CURTIR, que acompanha a rede social há bastante tempo. Essas, são chamadas pelo Facebook de “reactions”. Isso deve ajudar as marcas a entenderem melhor como seu público está reagindo ao conteúdo. Curtiu? #kife100 #kife9anos #facebookreactions


"Not every moment you want to share is happy," Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg wrote. "Sometimes you want to share something sad or frustrating. Our community has been asking for a dislike button for years, but not because people want to tell friends they don't like their posts."

Why would we want such a button, then?

"People wanted to express empathy and make it comfortable to share a wider range of emotions," Zuckerberg wrote.

So how will New Yorkers respond to their new ability to express such a wider range of emotions on Facebook? Well, we can't predict that. It's only day one, and only time will tell.

Check out Starbucks Just Changed Their Rewards Program and Everybody's Freaking TF Out.

[Feature Image Courtesy Instagram] 

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